Commercially driven services
Madrid,

Spain’s new high-speed trains make it Europe’s rail capital

Friday 25 November saw the launch of iryo -- the latest company to enter Spain's fast train market. With iryo's arrival, that makes three official competitors, but four competing brands -- making Spain the first country in Europe to have so many high-speed options.
 
Nick Brooks, secretary general of ALLRAIL, said ahead of the launch: "It is great to see how commercially driven Open Access services - such as iryo -- are making long-distance rail more attractive and winning travelers away from less sustainable transport modes, namely airlines and cars."
Read the article
Brussels,

Yesterday was the launch of iryo, first privately owned high-speed rail operator in Spain

MADRID, Spain - Yesterday morning, at 10.25 am Central European Time (CET), the inaugural service of iryo departed from Madrid to Valencia. iryo is the first privately owned high-speed rail operator in Spain.

Read the article
Madrid,

Today is the launch of iryo, first privately owned high-speed rail operator in Spain

On 21st November at 10.25 am CET, the inaugural service of iryo will depart from Madrid to Valencia. iryo is the first privately owned high-speed rail operator in Spain.

Its brand-new trains are yet another example of commercially driven Open Access long-distance services that focus upon sustainability, service and lower fares, leading to faster modal shift to rail.

Read the press release
Brussels,

Spanish Iryo takes off with inaugural journey

The 21st of November was a major milestone for the Spanish high-speed rail competition, as the inaugural train of operator Iryo took off. Secretary General Nick Brooks was on the inaugural service of the operator, saying: “It is great to see how commercially driven Open Access services – such as Iryo – are making long-distance rail more attractive and winning travellers away from less sustainable transport modes, namely airlines and cars.”

Read the article
Brussels,

Britain’s long distance rail fares could fall by over 40% by adopting Europe’s proven ‘Third Way’ model

In the ‘Open Access’ long-distance passenger rail model, rail operators are able to set fares, product and frequencies based upon meeting and growing passenger demand, rather than being confined to pre-set fares or timetables specified by Government or transport authorities.

In a growing number of countries, ‘Open Access’ long-distance operators fully compete against each other on the same route, which has led to higher frequencies, lower fares and savings for the taxpayer.

If Britain adopted the 'Open Access' model for long-distance passenger rail, fares could fall by over 40%.

Read the press release